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Tob Control. 2007 Apr;16(2):101-6.

Effect of smoking regulations in local restaurants on smokers' anti-smoking attitudes and quitting behaviours.

Author information

1
Social and Behavioral Sciences Department, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany Street, TW2, Boston, MA 02118, USA. aalbers@bu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effect of smoking regulations in local restaurants on anti-smoking attitudes and quitting behaviours among adult smokers.

DESIGN:

Hierarchical linear modelling (HLM) was used to assess the relationship between baseline strength of town-level restaurant smoking regulation and follow-up (1) perceptions of the social acceptability of smoking and (2) quitting behaviours.

SETTING:

Each of the 351 Massachusetts towns was classified as having strong (complete smoking ban) or weak (all other and no smoking restrictions) restaurant smoking regulations.

SUBJECTS:

1712 adult smokers of Massachusetts aged > or = 18 years at baseline who were interviewed via random-digit-dial telephone survey in 2001-2 and followed up 2 years later.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Perceived social acceptability of smoking in restaurants and bars, and making a quit attempt and quitting smoking.

RESULTS:

Among adult smokers who had made a quit attempt at baseline, living in a town with a strong regulation was associated with a threefold increase in the odds of making a quit attempt at follow-up (OR = 3.12; 95% CI 1.51 to 6.44). Regulation was found to have no effect on cessation at follow-up. A notable, although marginal, effect of regulation was observed for perceiving smoking in bars as socially unacceptable only among smokers who reported at baseline that smoking in bars was socially unacceptable.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although local restaurant smoking regulations did not increase smoking cessation rates, they did increase the likelihood of making a quit attempt among smokers who had previously tried to quit, and seem to reinforce anti-social smoking norms among smokers who already viewed smoking in bars as socially unacceptable.

PMID:
17400947
PMCID:
PMC2598469
DOI:
10.1136/tc.2006.017426
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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