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Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Apr;109(4):875-83.

Mental disorders and nicotine dependence among pregnant women in the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. rdg66@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association between mental disorders and cigarette use and nicotine dependence among pregnant women in the United States.

METHODS:

A face-to-face general population survey was conducted on participants in the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. One thousand five hundred sixteen women reporting a pregnancy in the past year were captured. Primary outcomes were seven Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition-defined mood and anxiety disorders and eight personality disorders, which were measured with the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule.

RESULTS:

Among pregnant women, 21.7% reported cigarette use and 12.4% met the criteria for nicotine dependence. Among pregnant women with cigarette use, 45.1% met criteria for at least one mental disorder, and among those with nicotine dependence, 57.5% met criteria for at least one other mental disorder. After adjusting for demographics and comorbidity, nicotine dependence during pregnancy significantly predicted any mental disorder (odds ratio [OR] 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1-5.1), any mood disorder (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.5-4.0), major depression (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.3-3.4), dysthymia (OR 6.2, 95% CI 2.9-13.1), and panic disorder (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.6-6.1) in the past year. No significant associations were found between nondependent cigarette use and mental disorders.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest an association between mental disorders and nicotine dependence among pregnant women in the United States. This association has far-reaching implications for both the mental and physical health of women and potentially for their children.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

III.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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