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Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2007 Aug;37(2):160-8. Epub 2007 Mar 29.

Apical oxidative hyaluronan degradation stimulates airway ciliary beating via RHAMM and RON.

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1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Ave., RMSB 7063A (R-47), Miami, FL 33136, USA.

Abstract

Hyaluronan (HA) is synthesized in high-molecular-weight form at the apical pole of airway epithelial cells, covering the luminal surface. When human airway epithelial cells grown and redifferentiated at the air-liquid interface (ALI) were exposed to xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO), ciliary beat frequency (CBF) increased. This effect was blocked by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis inhibited the CBF response to X/XO, while addition of exogenous HA amplified it. A functionally blocking antibody to the receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility (RHAMM) reduced the CBF response to X/XO. Since RHAMM has no transmembrane domain and thus cannot signal on its own, the association of RHAMM with recepteur d'origine nantais (RON), a member of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor family, was explored. Immunohistochemistry of human airway epithelium showed co-localization of RHAMM and RON at the apex of ciliated cells. Physical association of RHAMM and RON was confirmed with co-immunoprecipitations. Macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP), an agonist of RON, stimulated CBF. Genistein, a nonspecific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and MSP beta chain (beta-MSP), a specific RON inhibitor, blocked the X/XO-induced CBF increase. HA present in the apical secretions of human airway epithelial cells was shown to degrade upon exposure to X/XO, a process inhibited by SOD. Low-molecular-weight HA fragments stimulated CBF, an effect blocked by anti-RHAMM antibody and genistein. These data suggest that high molecular form HA is broken down by reactive oxygen species to form low-molecular-weight fragments that signal via RHAMM and RON to stimulate CBF.

PMID:
17395888
PMCID:
PMC1976543
DOI:
10.1165/rcmb.2006-0413OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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