Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuroscience. 2007 May 25;146(3):1182-92. Epub 2007 Mar 29.

Identification of novel striatal genes by expression profiling in adult mouse brain.

Author information

1
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Département Neurobiologie, 1, rue Laurent Fries BP 10142, Ilkirch, F-67400 France.

Abstract

Large-scale transcriptome analysis in the brain is a powerful approach to identify novel genes of potential interest toward understanding cerebral organization and function. We utilized the microarray technology to measure expression levels of about 24,000 genes and expressed sequence tags in mouse hippocampus, frontal cortex and striatum. Using expression profile obtained from whole brain as a reference, we categorized the genes into groups of genes either enriched in, or restricted to, one of the three areas of interest. We found enriched genes for each target area. Further, we identified 14 genes in the category of genes restricted to the striatum, among which were the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR88 and retinoic acid receptor-beta. These two genes were already reported to be selectively expressed in the striatum, thus validating our experimental approach. We selected 6 striatal-restricted genes, as well as 10 striatal-enriched candidates, that were previously undescribed. We analyzed their expression by in situ hybridization analysis in the brain, and quantitative RT-PCR in both brain and peripheral organs. Two of these unknown genes displayed a notable expression pattern. The striatal-restricted gene H3076B11 shows uniform expression throughout and uniquely in the striatum, representing a genuine striatal marker. The striatal-enriched gene 4833421E05Rik is preferentially expressed in the rostral striatum, and is also abundant in kidney, liver and lung. These two genes may contribute to some of the many striatal-controlled behaviors, including initiation of movement, habit formation, or reward and motivation.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center