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Pediatr Nephrol. 2007 Jul;22(7):1014-20. Epub 2007 Mar 23.

Progression of chronic renal failure in children with dysplastic kidneys.

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1
Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Renal Unit, Great Ormond Street, London, WC1N 3JH, UK.

Abstract

The aim of this study is to describe progression of chronic renal failure (CRF) in children with renal malformations and to study factors influencing this progression. We reviewed retrospectively 176 children with CRF secondary to renal dysplasia, reflux nephropathy or renal obstruction with at least 5 years of follow-up. Serum creatinine was recorded at least every third month, and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated. Number of febrile urinary tract infections (UTI), blood pressure, albuminuria (UaUc), and number of functioning kidneys was also recorded. We found that the development of renal function could be separated into three time periods: (1) During the first years of life, 82% of the children showed early improvement of their kidney function, which lasted until a median age of 3.2 years (median improvement 6.3 ml/year). (2) From the age of 3.2 years until 11.4 years, 52.5% of the studied children showed a stable kidney function, whereas in 47.5%, kidney function immediately started to deteriorate. (3) Around puberty, 42.9% started deterioration in kidney function, whereas 57.1% even after puberty showed a stable function. Patients with UaUc >200 mg/mmol deteriorated faster (-6.5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year compared with -1.5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year) in those with UaUc <50 mg/mmol. Children with more than two febrile UTIs, hypertension or an eGFR at onset of less than 40 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) deteriorated faster than the others. Most children experienced early improvement of kidney function. The further prognosis, early or late deterioration of kidney function or stable function during the whole follow-up, was related to albuminuria, number of febrile UTIs, eGFR at onset of deterioration, hypertension and puberty.

PMID:
17380351
DOI:
10.1007/s00467-007-0459-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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