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J Invest Dermatol. 2007 Jul;127(7):1647-56. Epub 2007 Mar 22.

Keratotic skin lesions and other risk factors are associated with skin cancer in organ-transplant recipients: a case-control study in The Netherlands, United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Italy.

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1
Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. J.N.Bouwes_Bavinck@lumc.nl

Abstract

This study examines the association of keratotic skin lesions with the development of skin cancer in 915 solid organ-transplant recipients in five European countries. In a hospital-based case-control study, cases with squamous- and basal-cell carcinoma were compared with controls without skin cancer. Questionnaires, scrutiny of medical charts, and skin examination were delivered according to a standardized protocol. Keratotic skin lesions and viral warts were counted on different body sites. Keratotic skin lesions were strongly associated with an increased risk of squamous-cell carcinoma, with adjusted odds ratios of 4.1 (2.4;7.0) and 12.1 (6.1;24) for 1-49 and 50 and more keratotic skin lesions compared with no lesions, respectively. Keratotic skin lesions were also associated with basal-cell carcinoma with adjusted odds ratios of 2.9 (1.7;4.9) and 4.0 (1.7;9.2) for 1-49 and 50 and more lesions, respectively. Lighter skin types and painful sunburns were also significantly associated with an increased risk of squamous- and basal-cell carcinoma. Keratotic skin lesions are strongly associated with skin cancer and are, thus, an important clinical criterion for identifying those organ-transplant recipients at an increased risk of skin cancers who should be offered more intensive skin surveillance.

PMID:
17380113
PMCID:
PMC2478722
DOI:
10.1038/sj.jid.5700776
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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