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Issues Ment Health Nurs. 1992 Jan-Mar;13(1):1-17.

Therapeutic use of "prizing" and its effect on self-concept of elderly clients in nursing homes and group homes.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to ascertain the effect of nurse high prizing and nurse low prizing during group therapy in changing the self-concept of institutionalized aged persons. The hypothesis tested was that institutionalized aged clients participating in group therapy who receive nurse high prizing will show an increase in self-concept as measured by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS) when compared with those aged clients in the same settings participating in group therapy who receive nurse low prizing or those aged clients constituting the matched control groups. The study used an existing data source generated from the research of Williams and Lindell to conduct a secondary analysis of a variable not previously investigated. Mean difference scores from the posttest total self-concept score and subscales of the TSCS were analyzed in conjunction with the levels of prizing within the experimental and control groups. Using the Scale for Rating Prizing, two nurse raters judged the degree of prizing on 40 randomly extracted video segments. The findings indicated that 47.1% of those subjects who received low prizing decreased in self-concept; 68.4% of those who received high prizing increased in self-concept. No change in self-concept was noted in the control group. Findings were significant at the .0001 level. Investigating the effect of nurse high and low levels of prizing on client self-concept completes the Rogerian trilogy of therapist-offered conditions with this same sample of subjects. Extension of previous studies adds to the ever-growing body of nursing knowledge and increases the certitude, casualty, and generalizability of such investigations.

PMID:
1737699
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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