Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Dermatol. 2007 Apr;156 Suppl 2:12-6.

The Greek experience with efalizumab in psoriasis from a University Dermatologic Hospital.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Andreas Sygros Hospital, University of Athens, Greece. phbiolun@otenet.gr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Efalizumab (anti-CD11a antibody) targets T cell-mediated steps important in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. As efalizumab is intended to be administered on a continuous long-term basis in psoriasis, it is important to share experience concerning issues commonly occurring during its use in real daily practice.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of efalizumab treatment in Greek patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, and to investigate whether there are specific characteristics that predict the clinical outcome of therapy.

PATIENTS:

Seventy-two patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, who had failed to respond to, or had a contraindication to, or were intolerant to other systemic therapies, received efalizumab (1 mg kg(-1) per week) for 12 weeks or more.

RESULTS:

After 12 weeks of efalizumab treatment, 65% of patients achieved 50% or more improvement from baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and 39% achieved at least 75% reduction in PASI score. The mean percentage PASI improvement from baseline was 62%. The most common side effects were a flu-like syndrome, a transient localized papular eruption, leucocytosis and lymphocytosis. There was no correlation between the occurrence of these side effects and the clinical response. Patients with a past history of unstable types of psoriasis were likely poor responders to efalizumab, and at an increased risk of developing generalized inflammatory flare.

CONCLUSION:

These results confirm previous reports suggesting that treatment with efalizumab is an efficacious and safe option for patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. A detailed previous history of psoriasis is important in order to select possible candidates for efalizumab therapy.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center