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Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Apr 15;44(8):1123-31. Epub 2007 Mar 7.

Impact of maternal HIV coinfection on the vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus: a meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. cpolis@jhsph.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Observational studies suggest that maternal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection is associated with increased odds of vertical HCV transmission. We performed a meta-analysis to summarize current evidence.

METHODS:

We systematically searched for relevant articles published during the period from January 1992 through July 2006 and independently abstracted articles that met our inclusion criteria. Under a random effects model, we calculated the pooled odds ratio for vertical HCV transmission according to maternal HIV-HCV coinfection status and performed sensitivity analyses.

RESULTS:

Ten articles met our inclusion criteria. Study quality varied widely, and study estimates displayed high statistical heterogeneity. Restriction of the analysis to studies that included >50 HIV-HCV-coinfected women provided our most reliable estimate: maternal HIV-HCV coinfection increases the odds of vertical HCV transmission by approximately 90% (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.36-2.67), compared with maternal HCV infection alone. When we restricted analyses to HIV-infected mothers with HCV viremia, the odds of vertical HCV transmission were 2.82-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.17-fold to 6.81-fold) greater than the odds for HIV-infected mothers without HCV viremia.

CONCLUSIONS:

HIV-HCV-coinfected women have significantly higher odds of transmitting HCV to their infants than do women who are infected with HCV alone.

Comment in

PMID:
17366462
DOI:
10.1086/512815
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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