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Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2007 Mar;76(3):592-5.

Vascular endothelial growth factor is associated with blood brain barrier dysfunction in eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection.

Author information

1
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung City, and National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China. hctsai1011@yahoo.com.tw

Abstract

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent vascular permeability factor and a mediator of brain edema. To assess the role of vascular endothelial growth factor in eosinophilic meningitis, vascular endothelial growth factor was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of 9 patients with eosinophilic meningitis in a cohort study. VEGFCSF was detected in 8 (90%) of 9 eosinophilic meningitis patients (range, 45-2190 pg/mL) at presentation. The mean VEGFCSF at presentation, 1 week, and 2 weeks after admission was 568 pg/mL, 751 pg/mL, and 1031 pg/mL, respectively. There was an association between VEGFCSF, CSF protein, white cell count, and eosinophil counts. The VEGFSERUM fluctuated during the 6-month follow-up period. These results indicate that vascular endothelial growth factor may be associated with blood-brain barrier disruption in patients with eosinophilic meningitis.

PMID:
17360889
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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