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World J Surg. 2007 Apr;31(4):808-16.

Platelets promote liver regeneration in early period after hepatectomy in mice.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Advanced Biomedical Applications, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Platelets contain several growth factors, including platelet-derived growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We examined the effects of platelet increment on liver regeneration after 70% hepatectomy. Hepatectomies were carried out in male BALB/c mice, and subsequently divided into three groups: (i) untreated mice, (ii) thrombocytotic mice induced with thrombopoietin, and (iii) thrombocytopenic mice induced with anti-platelet antibody. Growth kinetics in the liver were analyzed as a function of the liver/body weight ratio, the mitotic index, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index and Ki-67 labeling index. Activation of signal transduction pathways relating to cell proliferation were examined, including the STAT3, Akt, and ERK1/2 pathways. Platelet accumulation in the residual liver was quantified by immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy.

RESULTS:

In thrombocytotic and thrombocytopenic mice, liver/body weight ratios and Ki-67 labeling indices were significantly increased and significantly decreased, respectively, compared with untreated mice 48 hours post-hepatectomy. The Akt pathway was strongly activated, and platelet accumulation was significantly increased in thrombocytotic group 5 minutes post-hepatectomy compared with normal and thrombocytopenic groups. After hepatectomy platelets accumulated in the sinusoids of liver and promoted hepatocyte proliferation in early period after hepatectomy.

CONCLUSION:

By increasing or decreasing the platelet, marked changes in liver regeneration can occur, due to differences in cellular signaling and mitosis.

PMID:
17354025
DOI:
10.1007/s00268-006-0772-3
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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