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Chest. 1992 Feb;101(2):356-61.

Exercise testing in the evaluation of patients at high risk for complications from lung resection.

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1
Department of Medical Specialties, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston.

Abstract

Exercise testing was performed on 37 patients with resectable lung lesions who were deemed inoperable because of any of the following risk factors: (1) FEV1 less than or equal to 40 percent of predicted; (2) radionuclide calculated postlobectomy FEV1 less than or equal to 33 percent of predicted; or (3) arterial PCO2 greater than or equal to 45 mm Hg. The patients who reached a peak level of oxygen consumption during exercise (VO2Peak) of greater than or equal to 15 ml/kg/min were offered surgical treatment. Patients with a VO2Peak of less than 15 ml/kg/min were referred for nonsurgical management and excluded from the study. Eight patients underwent lung resection. Their pulmonary function revealed a severe obstructive lung defect with a group mean predicted FEV1 of 40 +/- 6 percent, an FEV1/FVC ratio of 47 +/- 10, a radionuclide calculated postlobectomy FEV1 of 31 +/- 4 percent, and a mean arterial PCO2 of 44 +/- 6 mm Hg. No relationship was found between each patient's exercise performance and spirometric function. Six of the patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Two patients had complications but no patient died as a result of surgery or postoperative complications. All patients were discharged from the hospital within 22 days (mean = 9.8 days). We conclude that exercise testing is a useful complement to conventional cardiopulmonary evaluation used in selecting patients for lung resection.

PMID:
1735254
DOI:
10.1378/chest.101.2.356
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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