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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2007 Mar-Apr;39(2):90-4.

Whole-grain intake is associated with body mass index in college students.

Author information

1
Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA. nrose@vt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To measure whole-grain intake in college students and determine the association with body mass index (BMI).

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional convenience sample of college students enrolled in an introductory nutrition course.

SETTING:

Large state university.

PARTICIPANTS:

159 college students, mean age: 19.9.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Intake of whole grains, refined grains, calories, and fiber from food records; BMI determined from height and weight measurements.

ANALYSIS:

Analysis of variance with linear contrasts; participants grouped by BMI category (P<.05).

RESULTS:

Average intake of cereal grains was 5.4 servings per day, of which whole-grain intake accounted for an average of 0.7 servings per day. Whole-grain intake was significantly higher in normal weight students than in overweight and obese students (based on BMI).

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

The low intake of whole grains in this population of college students indicates the need for interventions aiming to increase whole-grain intake to the recommended minimum of 3 servings per day. College students who are concerned about their body weight may be motivated to increase their intake of whole-grain foods; however, their intake of whole grains is likely to be influenced by the availability of these food items in campus dining halls and other locations around the college campus.

PMID:
17346657
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneb.2006.11.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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