Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Microbiol. 2007 May;45(5):1478-82. Epub 2007 Mar 7.

Prevalence and significance of a negative extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) confirmation test result after a positive ESBL screening test result for isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae: results from the SENTRY Asia-Pacific Surveillance Program.

Author information

1
Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia 5006, Australia.

Abstract

A negative extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) confirmation test result obtained after a positive ESBL screening test result using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods has been a common occurrence among isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program in the Asia-Pacific region. Among isolates collected between 1998 and 2004 this screen-positive, nonconfirmed profile (failed to show clavulanate synergy) was observed in 8.9% of 4,515 E. coli isolates and 20.3% of 2,303 K. pneumoniae isolates. We then selected 52 E. coli isolates and 68 K. pneumoniae isolates with a negative ESBL confirmation test, as well as comparable number of isolates with confirmed ESBL-positive tests, and examined them for the presence of TEM, SHV, plasmid-borne ampC, and CTX-M genes. We found that 62% of nonconfirming E. coli isolates and 75% of nonconfirming K. pneumoniae harbored a plasmid-borne AmpC enzyme of the CIT or DHA type. The majority of nonconfirming E. coli and K. pneumoniae from the Asia-Pacific region harbor important beta-lactamases, and a positive screening test alone should be sufficient grounds to report resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins in this region.

PMID:
17344367
PMCID:
PMC1865870
DOI:
10.1128/JCM.02470-06
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center