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Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2007 Jul-Aug;17(4):771-6. Epub 2007 Mar 5.

A phase II study of outpatient first-line paclitaxel, carboplatin, and bevacizumab for advanced-stage epithelial ovarian, peritoneal, and fallopian tube cancer.

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1
Gynecologic Oncology Associates, Hoag Cancer Center, Newport Beach, California 92663, USA. bram@gynoncology.com

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the response rate and toxicity of paclitaxel, carboplatin, and bevacizumab (PCB) primary induction therapy for the treatment of advanced-stage ovarian carcinoma. Twenty patients were treated with paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2)), carboplatin (AUC of 5 IV), and bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) of body weight; q21 days for six cycles. Bevacizumab was administered at cycles two through six. Patients received 116 cycles of PCB chemotherapy (median = 6, range 2-6) and were evaluable for toxicity assessment. Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia developed in 23.3% and 25% of cycles, with no incidence of grades 3/4 thrombocytopenia or anemia. Prior to cycle six, one patient was removed from the study due to grade 3 neuropathy and another patient was excluded due to clinical deterioration. There was no incidence of gastrointestinal perforations, and only two patients demonstrated grade 3 hypertension (HTN). No grade 4 HTN was observed. Eighteen patients were evaluated for response following induction therapy. Six demonstrated a complete response (30%) and ten exhibited a partial response (50%), resulting in a total response rate of 80%. One patient exhibited stable disease (5%), and one demonstrated disease progression (5%). The lack of bowel perforations and wound complications should mitigate some concerns regarding these side effects. This study suggests that first-line treatment with PCB can be safely administered to previously untreated advanced-stage ovarian carcinoma patients. The favorable toxicity results and reasonable response rate warrant additional study in a larger patient population.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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