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J Neurol Sci. 2007 Jun 15;257(1-2):185-93. Epub 2007 Feb 27.

Mild cognitive impairment in symptomatic and asymptomatic cerebrovascular disease.

Author information

1
University Department of Neurology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital, Vinogradska c. 29, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia. irene@post.htnet.hr

Abstract

We tried to evaluate and to compare usefulness of two brief cognitive tests in early detection of cognitive decline in subjects with increased cerebrovascular (CV) risk. As CV risk factors are recognised as important in etiology of dementia, we also aimed to determine the possible associations of specific CV risk factors and cognitive results. Patients (PGs) with first-ever stroke or TIA (N=110) and CV symptoms-free controls (CGs) with CV risk factors present (N=45) matched for age, gender and education level were tested using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) on admission, at three- and six-month points. In all subjects, detailed CV risk factors profile was assessed. We observed the decrement in cognitive performance during the six-month study period in both groups, more evident if MoCA (p<0.001) than if MMSE was used (p=0.022). Six months after first stroke/TIA 83.6% PGs scored below normal range on MoCA. In PGs, positive associations for cognitive decrement and multiple CV risk factors (>2) were found (p=0.034 for MMSE; p=0.002 for MoCA). In CGs, positive associations were found for cognitive decrement and arterial hypertension with increased IMT values (p<0.001 for MMSE) and for multiple CV risk factors and arterial hypertension (p=0.003 for MoCA). The use of MoCA could aid to early recognition of cognitive deficits in persons with increased CV risk. Individuals with multiple CV risk factors seem to have increased risk of cognitive decline.

PMID:
17328916
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2007.01.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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