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Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 2007 Mar;44(2):194-202.

Drug treatment during pregnancy and isolated orofacial clefts in hungary.

Author information

1
National Center for Healthcare Audit and Improvement, Department of Human Genetics and Teratology and the Foundation for the Community Control of Hereditary Diseases, Budapest, Hungary.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the possible association between all kinds of drug treatments during pregnancy and isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and posterior cleft palate (PCP) in the offspring.

SETTING:

The dataset of the large population-based Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996, was evaluated.

PARTICIPANTS:

One thousand three hundred seventy-four cases with isolated CL/P and 601 with PCP, plus 38,151 population controls (without birth defects) and 20,868 malformed controls with other defects.

INTERVENTION:

In this observation case-control study the data collection was based on prospective medical records particularly prenatal logbook, retrospective maternal data via a self-reported questionnaire, and home visits of nonresponding mothers.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Isolated CL/P and PCP associated with drug treatments during pregnancy.

RESULTS:

An increased risk for isolated CL/P was found in cases born to mothers treated with amoxicillin, phenytoin, oxprenolol, and thiethylperazine during the second and third month of pregnancy, i.e., the critical period of isolated CL/P. Risk of isolated PCP was increased in mothers with oxytetracycline and carbamazepine treatment during the third and fourth month of pregnancy, i.e., the critical period of PCP.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study confirmed the orofacial cleft (OFC) inducing effect of phenytoin, carbamazepine, oxytetracycline, and thiethylperazine and suggested a possible association between OFCs and oxprenolol and amoxicillin. However, drugs may have only a limited role in the origin of isolated OFCs.

PMID:
17328645
DOI:
10.1597/05-208.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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