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J Biomed Mater Res A. 2007 Sep 15;82(4):820-30.

Surface characterization and platelet adhesion studies for the mixed self-assembled monolayers with amine and carboxylic acid terminated functionalities.

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1
Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 70101.

Abstract

The mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAM) prepared from long chain alkanethiols, HS(CH(2))(11)NH(2) and HS(CH(2))(10)COOH, on gold are employed as the model surface for investigating the interactions between the biological environment and synthetic surface. A distinctive SAM preparation scheme was utilized in this investigation. The triethylamine was added to the alkanethiol solution during SAM formation and then followed by additional rinsing of SAM with 10% CH(3)COOH or 1% HCl ethanolic solution. The contact angle values of NH(2) + COOH mixed SAMs were between those of the pure SAMs, except that it was prepared with solution mole fraction of amine-terminated alkanethiol at 0.2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis has indicated that these two distinctive SAM preparation procedures had both resulted in a reduction in oxidized sulfur species on pure --NH(2) terminated SAM. However, the procedure utilizing 1% HCl ethanolic washing solution was more effective in reducing the unbound thiol fraction and to form a pure --NH(2) SAM with better quality. XPS analysis has also revealed that the surface of NH(2) + COOH mixed SAMs was "amine-rich". In vitro platelet adhesion assay has shown that the amount of adherent platelets on pure positive charged --NH(2) terminated SAM is less than that on anionic --COOH terminated counterpart in both acidic ethanolic washing schemes. Moreover, the lowest platelet adhesion density was noted on the mixed SAM surfaces with surface amine mole fraction at 0.51 and 0.57. This finding suggests that the surface charge with near neutrality might be of importance in reducing platelet adhesion and activation on artificial biomaterial.

PMID:
17326142
DOI:
10.1002/jbm.a.31193
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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