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J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2007 Jan-Feb;16(1):24-35.

Do cervical cancer screening rates increase in association with an intervention designed to increase mammography usage?

Author information

1
The School of Public Health, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. mira.katz@osumc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess cervical cancer screening behaviors among underserved women participating in an intervention designed to increase mammography use.

METHODS:

This was a randomized trial of 897 women from three racial groups (white, African American, Native American) living in a rural county in North Carolina. Baseline and followup surveys were completed by 815 women; 775 women provided data to be included in these analyses. The intervention group received an educational program focused on mammography delivered by a lay health advisor, and the control group received a physician letter/brochure focusing on Pap tests.

RESULTS:

Women in both the intervention (OR 1.70; 1.31, 2.21, p < 0.001) and control groups (OR 1.38; 1.04, 1.82, p = 0.025) significantly increased cervical cancer screening rates within risk appropriate guidelines. No differences by racial group were documented. Women categorized in the high-risk group for developing cervical cancer (>2 sexual partners, age <18 years at first sexual intercourse, smoker; treated for sexually transmitted disease [STD] or partner with treated STD) significantly (OR 1.88; 1.54, 2.28, p < 0.001) increased Pap test completion. However, a nonsignificant increase (OR 1.25; 0.87, 1.79, p = 0.221) in Pap test completion was demonstrated in women categorized as low risk for cervical cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study suggests that women in an intensive behavioral intervention designed to increase mammography use may also increase Pap test completion, similar to a minimal intervention focused only on increasing Pap test completion. These results have implications for the design and evaluation of behavioral intervention studies.

PMID:
17324094
PMCID:
PMC4465268
DOI:
10.1089/jwh.2006.0071
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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