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Clin Neurophysiol. 2007 May;118(5):1155-61. Epub 2007 Feb 26.

Medial plantar nerve conduction studies in healthy controls and diabetics.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø and University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. sissel.loseth@unn.no

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To collect a reference material of the medial plantar nerve action potential, to test intra/interobserver reliability in healthy controls and to apply the test to a group of patients with diabetes mellitus.

METHODS:

98 healthy controls and 50 patients with diabetes mellitus were included. The medial plantar nerve was stimulated orthodromically and recorded with a surface electrode. In the patient group, NCS of motor and sensory nerves and quantitative sensory testing were also performed.

RESULTS:

Responses of the medial plantar nerve were obtained from all controls except from one aged 72. Amplitude decreased with age (r=-0.68, p<0.0001). Intra/interobserver reliability was acceptable. 52% of the patients had abnormal overall NCS classification. Forty-eight percent had delayed tibial F-response latency. The medial plantar NCS were abnormal in 59% of the cases (47% abnormal NAP amplitude and 39% reduced CV), 59% of those with abnormal NCS had symptoms of sensory polyneuropathy. Only 24% had abnormal sural amplitude. Cold perception threshold was abnormal in more patients (30%) than warmth perception threshold (14%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Responses were easily obtained in controls under 70 years. In diabetics the amplitudes of the medial plantar nerve were abnormal more often than in the sural nerve.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The medial plantar nerve response is reliable in patients under 70 years, and intra/interobserver reliability is acceptable.

PMID:
17321794
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2007.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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