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Vet Microbiol. 2007 May 16;122(1-2):72-82. Epub 2007 Jan 23.

The involvement of Fas/FasL interaction in porcine circovirus type 2 and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus co-inoculation-associated lymphocyte apoptosis in vitro.

Author information

1
Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

Lymphoid depletion of various lymphoid organs is one of the major lesions in pigs suffering from postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). The co-existence of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in PMWS-affected pigs along with the more severe and wider range of lymphocyte depletion of lymphoid organs in PCV2 and PRRSV dually-inoculated pigs imply that PCV2 and PRRSV may interact in the pathogenesis of PMWS. The mechanism for the development of lymphoid depletion in PMWS-affected pigs remains controversial. The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare the effects of inoculation of both viruses, singularly or in combination, on swine splenic macrophages (SMs) and co-cultured splenic (SLs) and peripheral blood (PBLs) lymphocytes in vitro. A significant reduction in the survival rate and increase in the apoptotic rate of the co-cultured SLs and PBLs and concurrent increase in the expression levels of Fas ligand (FasL) in SMs and Fas in co-cultured SLs and PBLs were demonstrated in PRRSV alone- and PCV2 and PRRSV dually-inoculated groups with the latter more prominent. The increased FasL was proven capable of inducing Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis in co-cultured FasL-sensitive Jurkat T cells. The de novo expression and production of FasL in PCV2 and PRRSV dually-inoculated SMs and concurrently increased surface expression of Fas in co-cultured lymphocytes may contribute, at least partially, to lymphoid depletion in PMWS-affected pigs with PCV2 and PRRSV dual infection.

PMID:
17321702
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2007.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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