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Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2007 Mar;13(3):355-65.

Hematopoietic cell transplantation as curative therapy for idiopathic myelofibrosis, advanced polycythemia vera, and essential thrombocythemia.

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1
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA.

Abstract

A total of 104 patients, aged 18 to 70 years, with a diagnosis of chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis (CIMF), polycythemia vera (PV), or essential thrombocythemia (ET) with marrow fibrosis were transplanted from allogeneic (56 related and 45 unrelated) or syngeneic (n = 3) donors. Busulfan (BU) or total body irradiation (TBI)-based myeloablative conditioning regimens were used in 95 patients, and a nonmyeloablative regimen of fludarabine plus TBI was used in 9 patients. The source of stem cells was bone marrow in 43 patients and peripheral blood in 61 patients. A total of 63 patients were alive at a follow-up of 1.3-15.2 years (median, 5.3 years), for an estimated 7-year actuarial survival rate of 61%. Eleven patients had recurrent/persistent disease, of whom 8 died. Nonrelapse mortality was 34% at 5 years. Patients conditioned with targeted BU (plasma levels 800-900 ng/mL) plus cyclophosphamide (tBUCY) had a higher probability of survival (68%) than other patients. Dupriez score, platelet count, patient age, and comorbidity score were statistically significantly associated with mortality in univariate models. In a multivariable regression model, use of tBUCY (P = .03), high platelet count at transplantation (P = .01 for PV/ET; P = .39 for other diagnoses), younger patient age (P = .04), and decreased comorbidity score (P = .03) remained statistically significant for improved survival. Our findings show that hematopoietic cell transplantation offers potentially curative treatment for patients with ICMF, PV, or ET.

PMID:
17317589
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2006.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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