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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007 Apr;119(4):952-9. Epub 2007 Feb 20.

Oral administration of an IL-10-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain prevents food-induced IgE sensitization.

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1
University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Pediatrics, Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Because tolerance to food is potentially modulated by IL-10, strategies to prevent food allergy should favor an increased delivery of IL-10 to the gut.

OBJECTIVES:

We hypothesized that administration of a Lactococcus lactis transfected to secrete murine IL-10 could prevent sensitization in a mouse model of food allergy.

METHODS:

Before each oral sensitization with beta-lactoglobulin in the presence of cholera toxin, young mice were administered the transfected Lactococcus lactis. Antigen-induced anaphylaxis after oral challenge assessed clinical protection achieved by the pretreatment. Serum and feces antigen-specific antibody concentrations were sequentially measured. Antibody titers were correlated with antibody and IL-10-secreting cell numbers in the spleen and in Peyer patches.

RESULTS:

Pretreatment with transfected Lactococcus lactis contributed to diminish anaphylaxis significantly, and inhibit antigen-specific serum IgE and IgG(1) production strongly. In addition, transfected Lactococcus lactis increased the production of antigen-specific IgA in the gut. Variations of antibody levels in the serum and the gut correlated with the numbers of antibody-producing cells. In addition, the presence of exogenous IL-10 in the gut by transfected Lactococcus lactis induced IL-10 secretion by Peyer patches cells. Increased IL-10 titers were also measured in the plasma.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that a microorganism bioengineered to deliver IL-10 in the gut can decrease food-induced anaphylaxis and provide an option to prevent IgE-type sensitization to common food allergens.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

Nonpathogenic IL-10-producing microorganisms in the gut could have a potential to prevent systemic food-induced anaphylaxis.

PMID:
17316776
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2006.12.615
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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