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Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Jan;145(1):48-52.

Spirometric lung function. Distribution and determinants of test failure in a young adult population.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

Spirometric test failure has been defined as failure by a subject to meet the acceptability and/or reproducibility criteria laid down by the American Thoracic Society for measurements derived from forced expiratory maneuvers. The prevalence and determinants of spirometric test failure were examined in 416 men and women aged 20 to 45 yr working in an office environment. In this study population, 11.5% (28 men and 20 women) exhibited test failure for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). The main determinant of test failure in men was bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine challenge (odds ratio 6.7; confidence interval 1.7, 27.1) and in women being a current smoker (odds ratio 4.02; confidence interval 1.13, 14.33). There was also a relationship to eczema in both men and women, but not at a statistically significant level. When FEV1 variability was defined as the difference (in milliliters) between the two best FEV1 values and the results of men and women combined for analysis, significant predictors were a history of eczema, recurrent chest illness in the past 3 yr, and level of bronchial responsiveness to inhaled methacholine. These findings contribute to the gathering evidence that test failure may be of itself an indicator of impaired respiratory health, and its association with bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in men suggests that in them test failure is related to airway lability, but in women the relationship to smoking suggests an irritative mechanism.

PMID:
1731598
DOI:
10.1164/ajrccm/145.1.48
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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