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J Perinat Med. 2007;35(1):36-42.

Examining the relationship between positive mid-gestational fetal fibronectin assays and histological evidence of acute placental inflammation.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Magee-Womens Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA. aakers@mail.magee.edu

Abstract

AIMS:

Both acute placental inflammation and positive mid-gestational cervico-vaginal fetal fibronectin assays have been independently correlated with preterm delivery. We conducted this study to examine the relationship between positive mid-gestational fetal fibronectin (fFN) assays and histological evidence of acute placental inflammation at delivery among women presenting with symptomatic preterm labor.

METHODS:

This retrospective chart review included women who underwent cervico-vaginal fFN testing for preterm contractions between 24-34 weeks gestation and also had placental histological analysis after delivery. Women with a multiple gestation, cerclage, preterm premature rupture of membranes, intercourse or vaginal bleeding within 24 h before the assay were excluded. The primary outcome was histological evidence of acute placental inflammation defined as acute chorioamnionitis, acute deciduitis, funisitis, or microabscess formation.

RESULTS:

Of 82 women who met all study inclusion criteria, 45% were fFN positive. Women with positive assays were no more likely to have histological evidence of acute inflammation noted at birth than women with negative assays (45% vs. 26%, P=0.07). The assay had a sensitivity of 58.6%, specificity of 62.3%, positive predictive value of 46.0%, and negative predictive value of 73.3% for predicting acute inflammation at delivery.

CONCLUSIONS:

No association exists between positive fetal fibronectin assays and acute histologic placental inflammation at birth.

PMID:
17313308
DOI:
10.1515/JPM.2007.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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