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Arch Microbiol. 2007 Mar;187(3):217-26. Epub 2006 Nov 25.

Mechanism controlling the extended lag period associated with vinyl chloride starvation in Nocardioides sp. strain JS614.

Author information

1
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 4105 Seamans Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA. tim-mattes@uiowa.edu

Abstract

The extended lag period associated with vinyl chloride (VC) starvation in VC- and ethene-assimilating Nocardioides sp. strain JS614 was examined. The extended lag periods were variable (3-7 days), only associated with growth on VC or ethene, and were observed in VC- or ethene-grown cultures following 24 h carbon starvation and mid-exponential phase cultures grown on non-alkene carbon sources (e.g. acetate). Alkene monooxygenase (AkMO) and epoxyalkane:coenzyme M transferase (EaCoMT) are the initial enzymes of VC and ethene biodegradation in strain JS614. Reverse-transcription PCR confirmed that the AkMO gene etnC was expressed in response to epoxyethane, a metabolic intermediate of ethene biodegradation. Epoxyethane (0.5 mM) eliminated the extended lag period in both starved and mid-exponential phase cultures, suggesting that epoxyethane accumulation activates AkMO expression in strain JS614. AkMO activity in ethene-grown cultures was not detected after 6.7 h of carbon starvation, while 40% of the initial EaCoMT activity remained after 24 h. Acetate eliminated the extended lag period in starved cultures but not in mid-exponential phase cultures suggesting that acetate reactivates extant AkMO in starved VC- or ethene-grown cultures. The imbalance between AkMO and EaCoMT activities during starvation likely contributes to the extended lag period by delaying epoxide accumulation and subsequent AkMO induction.

PMID:
17308936
DOI:
10.1007/s00203-006-0189-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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