Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2007 Feb 14;2(2):e201.

Non-metabolic membrane tubulation and permeability induced by bioactive peptides.

Author information

1
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), UMR 538, CHU Saint Antoine, Paris, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Basic cell-penetrating peptides are potential vectors for therapeutic molecules and display antimicrobial activity. The peptide-membrane contact is the first step of the sequential processes leading to peptide internalization and cell activity. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in peptide-membrane interaction are not well understood and are frequently controversial. Herein, we compared the membrane activities of six basic peptides with different size, charge density and amphipaticity: Two cell-penetrating peptides (penetratin and R9), three amphipathic peptides and the neuromodulator substance P.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Experiments of X ray diffraction, video-microscopy of giant vesicles, fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidimetry and calcein leakage from large vesicles are reported. Permeability and toxicity experiments were performed on cultured cells. The peptides showed differences in bilayer thickness perturbations, vesicles aggregation and local bending properties which form lipidic tubular structures. These structures invade the vesicle lumen in the absence of exogenous energy.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

We showed that the degree of membrane permeabilization with amphipathic peptides is dependent on both peptide size and hydrophobic nature of the residues. We propose a model for peptide-induced membrane perturbations that explains the differences in peptide membrane activities and suggests the existence of a facilitated "physical endocytosis," which represents a new pathway for peptide cellular internalization.

PMID:
17299584
PMCID:
PMC1790702
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0000201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center