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Cancer Causes Control. 2007 May;18(4):399-413. Epub 2007 Feb 12.

Anthropometric factors and risk of endometrial cancer: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

Author information

1
Division of Population Health and Information, Alberta Cancer Board, T2N 4N2, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. chrisf@cancerboard.ab.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between anthropometry and endometrial cancer, particularly by menopausal status and exogenous hormone use subgroups.

METHODS:

Among 223,008 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, there were 567 incident endometrial cancer cases during 6.4 years of follow-up. The analysis was performed with Cox proportional hazards modeling.

RESULTS:

Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumferences and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were strongly associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer. The relative risk (RR) for obese (BMI 30- < 40 kg/m(2)) compared to normal weight (BMI < 25) women was 1.78, 95% CI = 1.41-2.26, and for morbidly obese women (BMI > or = 40) was 3.02, 95% CI = 1.66-5.52. The RR for women with a waist circumference of > or =88 cm vs. <80 cm was 1.76, 95% CI = 1.42-2.19. Adult weight gain of > or =20 kg compared with stable weight (+/-3 kg) increased risk independent of body weight at age 20 (RR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.11-2.77). These associations were generally stronger for postmenopausal than premenopausal women, and oral contraceptives never-users than ever-users, and much stronger among never-users of hormone replacement therapy compared to ever-users.

CONCLUSION:

Obesity, abdominal adiposity, and adult weight gain were strongly associated with endometrial cancer risk. These associations were particularly evident among never-users of hormone replacement therapy.

PMID:
17297555
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-006-0113-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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