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Eur J Cancer. 2007 May;43(7):1180-7. Epub 2007 Feb 9.

Body mass index does not predict prostate-specific antigen or percent free prostate-specific antigen in men undergoing prostate cancer screening.

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1
Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, 1058, rue St-Denis, Montréal, Que, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Body mass index (BMI) may alter serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) and percent free PSA (%fPSA) and may mask the risk of prostate cancer. We investigated the relationship between BMI and PSA or %fPSA.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Height, weight, PSA and %fPSA were assessed in 616 consecutive screened men without prostate cancer. Continuously coded and categorised BMI was studied. Statistical analyses consisted of ANOVA, linear regression, bivariate and partial correlations.

RESULTS:

Median age was 57 years. Median PSA was 1.0 and median %fPSA was 26. Median BMI was 25.8 kg/m(2). Neither continuously coded nor categorised BMI correlated with either PSA or %fPSA in unadjusted or age-adjusted analyses (all p values > or = 0.3).

CONCLUSIONS:

Body mass index does not affect PSA or %fPSA in men without known prostate cancer, who undergo prostate cancer screening. Therefore, PSA or %fPSA-based screening or early detection efforts do not require an adjustment for BMI.

PMID:
17292604
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejca.2007.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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