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Eur J Cancer. 2007 Mar;43(5):891-900. Epub 2007 Feb 7.

A time trend analysis of papillary and follicular cancers as a function of tumour size: a study of data from six cancer registries in France (1983-2000).

Author information

1
FRANCIM, French Cancer Registries Network, Faculté de Médecine, 37 allée Jules Guesdes, 31073 Toulouse Cedex, France. mcolonna.registre@wanadoo.fr

Abstract

The incidence of thyroid cancers, and in particular the papillary forms, has been increasing sharply for many years in Western countries. However, the factors explaining this increase have not been clearly established. Some studies mention the effects of radioactive fallout, particularly after the accident in Chernobyl. Another probable cause is related to progress in medical practice, and particularly in diagnosis. In this article, we describe time trends in the incidence of papillary and follicular cancers, taking into account the size of the tumour at the time of diagnosis. The analysis was carried out on cases from six French cancer registries for the period 1983-2000. Anatomopathological reports concerning 3381 cancer cases were systematically recoded and centralised, following ICDO-3 rules. Over the whole period, the annual percent change of the incidence of papillary cancers was +8.13% and +8.98%, respectively in men and in women. For micropapillary carcinomas (< or = 10 mm), this increase was respectively +12.05% and +12.85%. There is no significant effect of period apart from micropapillary carcinomas in women. However, a birth cohort effect exists for some groups. This effect corresponds to an acceleration in the risk for people born after the 1930s. For the most recent period (1998-2000), half the cases of papillary cancer were micropapillary carcinomas, and for one third of these, the tumour was < or = 5 mm. Our description of a time trend of incidence as a function of tumour size supports the hypothesis of the role of medical practice in a context of high prevalence. Obviously, these findings do not exclude the possible role of other factors.

PMID:
17289376
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejca.2006.11.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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