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Prim Dent Care. 2007 Jan;14(1):7-11.

Do dental anxiety questionnaires raise anxiety in dentally anxious adult patients? A two-wave panel study.

Author information

1
The Bute Medical School, University of St Andrews, Fife, UK. gerry.humphris@st-andrews.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test whether or not dentally anxious patients attending the dentist for an appointment become more anxious when completing a dental anxiety questionnaire.

BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN:

Patients were initially screened to include only those who were dentally anxious. A pre- and post-test was planned with the completion of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) questionnaire as the intervention.

CLINICAL SETTING:

Two dental access centres in the North West of England.

PARTICIPANTS:

Initially, 583 patients were screened. Of these, 182 (31%) were found to be dentally anxious and were recruited into the study.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Scale Short Form.

RESULTS:

State anxiety did not change with the completion of the MDAS questionnaire in either designated dental phobics (MDAS >or=19) or those classified as non-phobics (MDAS <19).

CONCLUSIONS:

The MDAS can be used to assess dental anxiety without raising anxiety in patients with or without self-reported dental phobia.

PMID:
17288717
DOI:
10.1308/135576107779398165
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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