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Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Nov;12(11):1701-8.

Gastroenteritis and transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection in households.

Author information

1
Division of Infection Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA. shnperry@stanford.edu

Abstract

The mode of transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection is poorly characterized. In northern California, 2,752 household members were tested for H. pylori infection in serum or stool at a baseline visit and 3 months later. Among 1,752 person considered uninfected at baseline, 30 new infections (7 definite, 7 probable, and 16 possible) occurred, for an annual incidence of 7% overall and 21% in children <2 years of age. Exposure to an infected household member with gastroenteritis was associated with a 4.8-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-17.1) increased risk for definite or probable new infection, with vomiting a greater risk factor (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 6.3, CI 1.6-24.5) than diarrhea only (AOR 3.0, p = 0.65). Of probable or definite new infections, 75% were attributable to exposure to an infected person with gastroenteritis. Exposure to an H. pylori-infected person with gastroenteritis, particularly vomiting, markedly increased risk for new infection.

PMID:
17283620
PMCID:
PMC3372328
DOI:
10.3201/eid1211.060086
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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