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Trends Cell Biol. 2007 Mar;17(3):107-17. Epub 2007 Feb 1.

The matrix corroded: podosomes and invadopodia in extracellular matrix degradation.

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1
Institut für Prophylaxe und Epidemiologie der Kreislaufkrankheiten, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Pettenkoferstr. 9, 80336 München, Germany. stefan.linder@med.uni-muenchen.de <stefan.linder@med.uni-muenchen.de>

Abstract

Podosomes and invadopodia are unique actin-rich adhesions that establish close contact to the substratum but can also degrade components of the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, matrix degradation localized at podosomes or invadopodia is thought to contribute to cellular invasiveness in physiological and pathological situations. Cell types that form podosomes include monocytic, endothelial and smooth muscle cells, whereas invadopodia have been mostly observed in carcinoma cells. This review highlights important new developments in the field, discusses the common and divergent features of podosomes and invadopodia and summarizes current knowledge about matrix-degrading proteinases at these structures.

PMID:
17275303
DOI:
10.1016/j.tcb.2007.01.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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