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J Virol. 1992 Jan;66(1):244-50.

Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus enhancer function by PRDII-BF1 and c-rel gene products.

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1
Department of Medicine, Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas 75235.

Abstract

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enhancer element is important in the regulation of HIV gene expression. A number of cellular proteins have been demonstrated to bind to the NF-kappa B motifs in this element. The genes encoding several of these proteins, including members of the rel family and PRDII-BF1, have been cloned. We characterized the binding of proteins encoded by the human c-rel and PRDII-BF1 genes to HIV NF-kappa B motifs and related enhancer elements. Both the human c-rel protein and two proteins derived from the PRDII-BF1 gene by alternative splicing bound specifically to the HIV NF-kappa B motif and related enhancer elements found in the immunoglobulin kappa, class I major histocompatibility complex, and interleukin-2 receptor genes. To determine the role of these factors in regulating HIV gene expression, we fused the cDNAs encoding either of the two proteins derived by alternative splicing of the PRDII-BF1 gene or the c-rel gene to the DNA binding region of the yeast transcription factor GAL4. GAL4 binding sites were inserted in place of the native HIV enhancer sequences in an HIV long terminal repeat chloramphenicol acetyltransferase construct. Cotransfection of these constructs revealed that c-rel was a strong activator of basal HIV gene expression but did not result in synergistic effects in the presence of tat. PRDII-BF1-derived cDNAs did not result in stimulation of either basal or tat-induced activated gene expression. These results indicate that multiple enhancer binding proteins may potentially regulate HIV in both a positive and negative manner.

PMID:
1727488
PMCID:
PMC238281
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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