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J Athl Train. 2006 Oct-Dec;41(4):441-9.

Injuries sustained by pediatric ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey athletes presenting to United States emergency departments, 1990-2003.

Author information

1
Center for Injury Research and Policy, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA. YardE@ccri.net

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey are increasingly popular sports among US youth athletes, but no authors to date have compared injuries in male and female pediatric (ages 2 through 18 years) participants.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare patterns of injury among pediatric ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey players.

DESIGN:

A descriptive analysis of all pediatric (ages 2 through 18 years) ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey injuries captured by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.

SETTING:

US Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Children with ice hockey, lacrosse, or field hockey injuries presenting to emergency departments participating in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES(S):

We reviewed all ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey injuries captured by the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System and categorized them by sex, age, injury site, and injury diagnosis.

RESULTS:

An estimated 321 237 pediatric participants in ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey presented to US emergency departments from 1990 through 2003. The injured were primarily male (74.4%) and aged 10 through 18 years (95.4%). Ice hockey accounted for more injuries (53.6%) than lacrosse (26.5%) or field hockey (19.9%). Children aged 2 through 9 years sustained twice the proportion of head and face injuries (53.1%) as children aged 10 through 18 years (23.2%) (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 2.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.94 to 2.62). Males incurred a higher proportion of shoulder and upper arm injuries (14.1%) than females (3.1%) (IRR = 4.51, 95% CI = 3.07 to 6.62). The proportion of concussion was higher in ice hockey players (3.9%) than in field hockey players (1.4%) (IRR = 2.75, 95% CI = 1.17 to 6.46). Females in lacrosse had twice the proportion of facial injuries (20.9%) as males (10.5%) (IRR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.46 to 2.60). In all sports, the ball or puck caused a greater proportion of face injuries in females than in males (IRR = 2.48, 95% CI = 2.03 to 3.05). Facial injuries from falls occurred in higher proportions in ice hockey players (10.6%) than in lacrosse (2.4%) (IRR = 4.32, 95% CI = 1.53 to 12.18) and field hockey (0.4%) players (IRR = 28.38, 95% CI = 6.71 to 120.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Pediatric ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey injuries differed by age and sport and, within each sport, by sex. An understanding of sport-specific patterns of injury should assist coaches and certified athletic trainers in developing targeted preventive interventions.

PMID:
17273471
PMCID:
PMC1748420

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