Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2007 Feb 1;32(3):388-93.

Level of evidence in Spine compared to other orthopedic journals.

Author information

  • 1Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37212-3450, USA.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Two reviewers rated the 112 clinical articles, from January through June 2003, published in Spine using a level-of-evidence grading system. The ratings were compared to previously published ratings of 2 orthopedic journals with similar impact factors.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare Spine to other orthopedic journals using a level-of-evidence rating system.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

A previous study evaluating the levels of evidence in 9 orthopedic journals found a correlation between higher-level studies and journal impact factor. Spine was not included in the analysis.

METHODS:

Studies were designated therapeutic, prognostic, diagnostic, or economic, and their evidence rated as level I, II, III, or IV. Reviewers were blinded to the other's ratings.

RESULTS:

Ratings were as follows: 43.8% of the Spine articles were therapeutic, 37.5% prognostic, 17.9% diagnostic, and 0.9% economic. Of studies, 16.1% were level I, 22.3% level II, 8.0% level III, and 53.6% level IV. Kappa values for interobserver reliability showed good correlation between reviewers. There was no significant difference among Spine and 2 leading orthopedic journals in their likelihood of publishing level I or II studies.

CONCLUSION:

Spine publishes clinical studies with levels of evidence comparable to the 2 orthopedic journals with similar impact factors.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Support Center