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Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2007 Feb;28(2):185-90. Epub 2007 Jan 17.

Isolation and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates in a dental clinic environment.

Author information

1
Department of Physiologic Sciences, São Leopoldo Mandic, Campinas, Brazil. rogeriomotta@fop.unicamp.br

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the number of Staphylococcus aureus isolates collected in a dental clinical environment and to determine their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents commonly used in dentistry.

SETTING:

Undergraduate clinic of the Dental School of Piracicaba, University of Campinas, Brazil.

METHODS:

Sterile cotton swabs were used to collect the samples from dental-chair push buttons, light handles, 3-in-1 syringes, computer "Enter" keys, doorknobs, and X-ray tubes before, during, and after clinical procedures. These samples were spread on brain-heart infusion agar and were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The resulting S. aureus isolates were counted and classified using Gram staining and biochemical tests. The counts among the 3 periods and the groups were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (alpha =5%). Commercial paper disks containing widely prescribed antimicrobial agents (beta-lactams, macrolides, clindamycin, and vancomycin) were used to perform the antimicrobial susceptibility tests.

RESULTS:

An increase in the number of microorganisms was observed during clinical procedures (P<.05). The highest bacterial resistance rates were observed for the beta -lactam group. All isolated strains were sensitive to vancomycin, and 2% of them were resistant to methicillin.

CONCLUSIONS:

Clinical procedures increased the number and proportion of antimicrobial-resistant S. aureus isolates dispersed in a dental clinical environment. The present study highlights the need to establish strategies to prevent emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains in dental settings.

PMID:
17265400
DOI:
10.1086/510867
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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