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Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2007 Jul;24(7):615-9. Epub 2007 Jan 30.

Scheduled prophylactic ondansetron administration did not improve its antiemetic efficacy after intracranial tumour resection surgery in children.

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1
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Anaesthesiology, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. subramaniamk@upmc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Postoperative nausea and vomiting after craniotomy may increase intracranial pressure and morbidity in children. This prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled and double-blinded study was designed to evaluate the antiemetic efficacy of prophylactic ondansetron after intracranial tumour resections in children.

METHODS:

Ninety children were divided into three groups and received saline (Group 1), ondansetron 150 microg kg-1 intravenously at dural closure (Group 2) or two doses of ondansetron 150 microg kg-1 intravenously, the second dose repeated after 6 h (Group 3). Episodes of nausea, emesis and side-effects were noted for 24 h postoperatively.

RESULTS:

Overall 24 h incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting was not significantly different among the three groups (9 (37.5%) in Group 1 vs. 7 (27%) in Group 2 and 8 (32%) in Group 3, P = 0.73). No difference in rescue antiemetic treatment or postoperative nausea and vomiting at specific time intervals (0-6 and 6-24 h postoperative period) was seen among the three groups. No significant side-effects were noted in any of the three groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Ondansetron, in this study of 90 children, was not very effective in preventing nausea and vomiting after neurosurgical operations.

PMID:
17261211
DOI:
10.1017/S0265021506002092
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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