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Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2007 Feb;33(2):200-12.

Power, propensity to negotiate, and moving first in competitive interactions.

Author information

1
New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA. joe.magee@nyu.edu

Abstract

Five experiments investigated how the possession and experience of power affects the initiation of competitive interaction. In Experiments 1a and 1b, high-power individuals displayed a greater propensity to initiate a negotiation than did low-power individuals. Three additional experiments showed that power increased the likelihood of making the first move in a variety of competitive interactions. In Experiment 2, participants who were semantically primed with power were nearly 4 times as likely as participants in a control condition to choose to make the opening arguments in a debate competition scenario. In Experiment 3, negotiators with strong alternatives to a negotiation were more than 3 times as likely to spontaneously express an intention to make the first offer compared to participants who lacked any alternatives. Experiment 4 showed that high-power negotiators were more likely than low-power negotiators to actually make the first offer and that making the first offer produced a bargaining advantage.

PMID:
17259581
DOI:
10.1177/0146167206294413
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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