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Exp Hematol. 2007 Feb;35(2):184-92.

Changes in salivary proteome following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Author information

  • 1Clinical Research Core, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) is frequently complicated by severe infections and graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Saliva contains many components of adaptive and innate immune response crucial for local host defenses. Changes in salivary constituents could reflect systemic processes such as immune reconstitution and development of GVHD that occur posttransplant. This study was an initial evaluation of salivary protein changes that occur after allo-HCT.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Serially collected saliva samples from 41 patients undergoing allo-HCT were evaluated. Changes in salivary proteome were initially examined by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Individual protein changes were identified by 2-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) with subsequent MS/MS sequencing and ELISA.

RESULTS:

Significant increases and decreases in multiple salivary proteins that lasted at least 2 months posttransplant were detected by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Lactoferrin and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor demonstrated elevations 1 month post-HCT that persisted at least 6 months. Secretory IgA (sIgA) levels were decreased 1 month posttransplant, with recovery at approximately 6 months. Levels of salivary beta(2)-microglobulin were elevated at 6 months and correlated with sIgA levels.

CONCLUSION:

Allo-HCT is associated with long-term changes in several salivary proteins important for innate immune responses. These results support further studies on the association of salivary proteins with posttransplant complications including infections and GVHD.

PMID:
17258067
PMCID:
PMC1832107
DOI:
10.1016/j.exphem.2006.10.009
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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