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J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 Jan-Feb;36(1):9-20. doi: 10.1111/j.1552-6909.2006.00109.x.

Barriers and facilitators for breastfeeding among working women in the United States.

Author information

1
United States Air Force (USAF), Nurse Corps and a women's health nurse practitioner, at Women's Health Care Clinic, Cannon AFB, NM.. Electronic address: marina43402@earthlink.net.
2
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To review the literature and describe the barriers and facilitators to the continuation of breastfeeding for at least 6 months by working women in the United States.

DATA SOURCES:

A search of PubMed, CINAHL, Sociological Abstracts, ISI, PsychInfo, and ProQuest.

STUDY SELECTION:

Twenty studies based on the inclusion criteria and published between January 1, 1995, and January 2006.

DATA EXTRACTION:

An ecologic framework, which includes the individual (microsystem), social support and relationships (mesosystem), and the workplace environment (exosystem).

DATA SYNTHESIS:

When working mothers possess certain personal characteristics and develop a strategic plan, breastfeeding is promoted. When social support is available and when support groups are utilized, lactation is also facilitated. Part-time work, lack of long mother-infant separations, supportive work environments and facilities, and child care options facilitate breastfeeding.

CONCLUSIONS:

Health care providers can use the findings of this review to promote breastfeeding among working women by using tactics geared toward the mother, her social network, and the entire community.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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