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Am J Prev Med. 2007 Mar;32(3):231-8. Epub 2007 Jan 22.

Computer-based brief intervention a randomized trial with postpartum women.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48207, USA. s.ondersma@wayne.edu

Erratum in

  • Am J Prev Med. 2007 Jun;32(6):549.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Drug use among parenting women is a significant risk factor for a range of negative child outcomes, including exposure to violence, child maltreatment, and child behavior problems. Implementation of brief interventions with this population may be greatly facilitated by computer-based interventions.

DESIGN:

Randomized clinical trial with 4-month follow-up.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS:

Participants were 107 postpartum women recruited from an urban obstetric hospital primarily serving a low-income population. Women were randomized into assessment only versus assessment plus brief intervention conditions; 76 (71%) returned for follow-up evaluation.

INTERVENTION:

A 20-minute, single-session, computer-based motivational intervention (based on motivational interviewing methods), combined with two nontailored mailings and voucher-based reinforcement of attendance at an initial intake/treatment session.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Illicit drug use as measured by qualitative urinalysis and self-report.

RESULTS:

Frequency of illicit drug use other than marijuana increased slightly for the control group, but declined among intervention group participants (p<0.05, between-group Mann-Whitney U; d=0.50); the magnitude of intervention effects on changes in marijuana use frequency was similar, but did not reach statistical significance. Point-prevalence analysis at follow-up did not show significant group differences in drug use. However, trends under a range of assumptions regarding participants lost to follow-up all favored the intervention group, with most effect sizes in the moderate range (odds ratios 1.4 to 4.7).

CONCLUSIONS:

Results tentatively support the efficacy of this high-reach, replicable brief intervention. Further research should seek to replicate these findings and to further develop the computer as a platform for validated brief interventions.

PMID:
17236741
PMCID:
PMC1858656
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2006.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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