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J Clin Oncol. 2007 Mar 1;25(7):760-6. Epub 2007 Jan 16.

Phase II clinical trial of chemotherapy-naive patients > or = 70 years of age treated with erlotinib for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

Author information

1
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This is a phase II, multicenter, open-label study of chemotherapy-naïve patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and age > or = 70 years who were treated with erlotinib and evaluated to determine the median, 1-year, and 2-year survival. The secondary end points include radiographic response rate, time to progression (TTP), toxicity, and symptom improvement.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Eligible patients with NSCLC were treated with erlotinib 150 mg/d until disease progression or significant toxicity. Tumor response was assessed every 8 weeks by computed tomography scan using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Tumor samples were analyzed for the presence of somatic mutations in EGFR and KRAS.

RESULTS:

Eighty eligible patients initiated erlotinib therapy between March 2003 and May 2005. There were eight partial responses (10%), and an additional 33 patients (41%) had stable disease for 2 months or longer. The median TTP was 3.5 months (95% CI, 2.0 to 5.5 months). The median survival time was 10.9 months (95% CI, 7.8 to 14.6 months). The 1- and 2- year survival rates were 46% and 19%, respectively. The most common toxicities were acneiform rash (79%) and diarrhea (69%). Four patients developed interstitial lung disease of grade 3 or higher, with one treatment-related death. EGFR mutations were detected in nine of 43 patients studied. The presence of an EGFR mutation was strongly correlated with disease control, prolonged TTP, and survival.

CONCLUSION:

Erlotinib monotherapy is active and relatively well tolerated in chemotherapy-naïve elderly patients with advanced NSCLC. Erlotinib merits consideration for further investigation as a first-line therapeutic option in elderly patients.

PMID:
17228019
DOI:
10.1200/JCO.2006.07.5754
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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