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World J Gastroenterol. 2007 Jan 14;13(2):236-43.

Correlation between in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory properties of lactic acid bacteria.

Author information

1
Bactéries Lactiques and Immunité des Muqueuses, Institut Pasteur de Lille, 1 Rue du Professeur Calmette, Lille cedex F-59019, France.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate the correlation between in vitro and in vivo immunomodulation potential of the probiotic strain and its ability to prevent experimental colitis in mice.

METHODS:

In vitro immunomodulation was assessed by measuring interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and interferon gamma (IFNgamma) release by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after 24 h stimulation with 13 live bacterial strains. A murine model of acute TNBS-colitis was next used to evaluate the prophylactic protective capacity of the same set of strains.

RESULTS:

A strain-specific in vivo protection was observed. The strains displaying an in vitro potential to induce higher levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and lower levels of the inflammatory cytokine IL-12, offered the best protection in the in vivo colitis model. In contrast, strains leading to a low IL-10/IL-12 cytokine ratio could not significantly attenuate colitis symptoms.

CONCLUSION:

These results show that we could predict the in vivo protective capacity of the studied lactic acid bacteria (LAB) based on the cytokine profile we established in vitro. The PBMC-based assay we used may thus serve as a useful primary indicator to narrow down the number of candidate strains to be tested in murine models for their anti-inflammatory potential.

PMID:
17226902
PMCID:
PMC4065951
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v13.i2.236
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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