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Eur J Pediatr. 2007 Aug;166(8):849-55. Epub 2007 Jan 17.

Stimulation programs for pediatric drug research--do children really benefit?

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Willem Alexander Kinder- en Jeugdcentrum, LUMC, Postbus 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Most drugs that are currently prescribed in pediatrics have not been tested in children. Pediatric drug studies are stimulated in the USA by the pediatric exclusivity provision under the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act (FDAMA) that grants patent extensions when pediatric labeling is provided. We investigated the effectiveness of these programs in stimulating drug research in children, thereby increasing the evidence for safe and effective drug use in the pediatric population. All drugs granted pediatric exclusivity under the FDAMA were analyzed by studying the relevant summaries of medical and clinical pharmacology reviews of the pediatric studies or, if these were unavailable, the labeling information as provided by the manufacturer. A systematic search of the literature was performed to identify drug utilization patterns in children. From July 1998 to August 2006, 135 drug entities were granted pediatric exclusivity. Most frequent drug groups were anti-depressants and mood stabilizers, ACE inhibitors, lipid-lowering preparations, HIV antivirals, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and anti-rheumatic drugs. The distribution of the different drugs closely matched the distribution of these drugs over the adult market, and not the drug utilization by children. Many drug studies in children have been performed since the introduction of the FDAMA. However, children infrequently use the drugs granted pediatric exclusivity. The priorities for pediatric drug research should be set by the need of the patients, not by market considerations.

PMID:
17225950
PMCID:
PMC1914295
DOI:
10.1007/s00431-006-0381-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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