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Eur J Pain. 2007 Oct;11(7):711-8. Epub 2007 Jan 10.

Self-efficacy mediates the relation between pain-related fear and outcome in chronic low back pain patients.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, North Manchester General Hospital, Crumpsall, Manchester, UK. steve.woby@pat.nhs.uk

Abstract

This study aimed to determine whether self-efficacy beliefs mediated the relation between pain-related fear and pain, and between pain-related fear and disability in CLBP patients who exhibited high pain-related fear. In a cross-sectional design, 102 chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients completed measures for pain, disability, self-efficacy and pain-related fear (fear of movement and catastrophizing). Multistep regression analyses were performed to determine whether self-efficacy mediated the relation between pain-related fear and outcome (pain and/or disability). Self-efficacy was found to mediate the relation between pain-related fear and pain intensity, and between pain-related fear and disability. Therefore, this study suggests that when self-efficacy is high, elevated pain-related fear might not lead to greater pain and disability. However, in instances where self-efficacy is low, elevated pain-related fear is likely to lead to greater pain and disability. In view of these findings, we conclude that it is imperative to assess both pain-related fear and self-efficacy when treating CLBP patients with high pain-related fear.

PMID:
17218132
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejpain.2006.10.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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