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Clin Exp Obstet Gynecol. 2006;33(4):205-8.

Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Fertilityblend: a nutritional supplement for improving fertility in women.

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  • 1Department of Gynecology/Obstetrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the impact of nutritional supplementation on female fertility.

METHODS:

A double blind, placebo-controlled study of the effects of FertilityBlend for Women, a proprietary nutritional supplement containing chasteberry, green tea, L-arginine, vitamins (including folate) and minerals, on progesterone level, basal body temperature, menstrual cycle length, pregnancy rate and side-effects.

RESULTS:

Ninety-three (93) women, aged 24-42 years, who had tried unsuccessfully to conceive for six to 36 months, completed the study. After three months, the FertilityBlend (FB) group (N = 53) demonstrated a trend toward increased mean mid-luteal progesterone (P(ml)), but among women with basal pretreatment P(ml) < 9 ng/ml, the increase in progesterone was highly significant. The average number of days with luteal-phase basal temperatures over 98 degrees F increased significantly in the FB group. Both short and long cycles (< 27 days or > 32 days pretreatment) were normalized in the FB group. The placebo group (N = 40) did not show any significant changes in these parameters. After three months, 14 of the 53 women in the FB group were pregnant (26%) compared to four of the 40 women in the placebo group (10%; p = 0.01). Three additional women conceived after six months on FB (32%). No significant side-effects were noted.

CONCLUSION:

Nutritional supplements could provide an alternative or adjunct to conventional fertility therapies.

PMID:
17211965
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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