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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Jan;88(1):37-42.

Influence of lever arm and stabilization on measures of hip abduction and adduction torque obtained by hand-held dynamometry.

Author information

1
Physical Therapy Program, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA. krause.david@mayo.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the reliability of clinical techniques for testing hip abductor and adductor muscle performance.

DESIGN:

Repeated measures.

SETTING:

Academic laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

A sample of 21 healthy subjects (12 men, 9 women) between 22 and 31 years of age.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Reliability of repeated measures was estimated by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients. Torque production capability was calculated by multiplying force output obtained with a hand-held dynamometer by the length of the resistance lever arm.

RESULTS:

The reliability of abduction testing was greatest in the long-lever condition. Adduction test reliability was greatest in the long-lever condition with bench stabilization. The maximal hip abduction torque tested in the long-lever position was significantly greater (t(20)=9.21, P<.001) than that in the short-lever position. The maximal hip adduction torque occurred using a long lever for resistance application and a bench to stabilize the nontest leg (F(1,20)=15.64, P=.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Muscle performance testing of hip abductors and adductors with a hand-held dynamometer can be performed with good to excellent intratester and intertester reliability. Hip abduction testing is best performed with a long lever. Hip adduction is best performed with a long lever and a bench to stabilize the nontest extremity.

PMID:
17207673
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2006.09.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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