Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Comp Neurol. 2007 Mar 1;501(1):168-83.

Breaches of the pial basement membrane and disappearance of the glia limitans during development underlie the cortical lamination defect in the mouse model of muscle-eye-brain disease.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York 13210, USA. huh@upstate.edu

Erratum in

  • J Comp Neurol. 2007 May 10;502(2):337.

Abstract

Neuronal overmigration is the underlying cellular mechanism of cerebral cortical malformations in syndromes of congenital muscular dystrophies caused by defects in O-mannosyl glycosylation. Overmigration involves multiple developmental abnormalities in the brain surface basement membrane, Cajal-Retzius cells, and radial glia. We tested the hypothesis that breaches in basement membrane and the underlying glia limitans are the key initial events of the cellular pathomechanisms by carrying out a detailed developmental study with a mouse model of muscle-eye-brain disease, mice deficient in O-mannose beta31,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (POMGnT1). The pial basement membrane was normal in the knockout mouse at E11.5. It was breached during rapid cerebral cortical expansion at E13.5. Radial glial endfeet, which comprise glia limitans, grew out of the neural boundary. Neurons moved out of the neural boundary through these breaches. The overgrown radial glia and emigrated neurons disrupted the overlying pia mater. The overmigrated neurons did not participate in cortical plate (CP) development; rather they formed a diffuse cell zone (DCZ) outside the original cortical boundary. Together, the DCZ and the CP formed the knockout cerebral cortex, with disappearance of the basement membrane and the glia limitans. These results suggest that disappearance of the basement membrane and the glia limitans at the cerebral cortical surface during development underlies cortical lamination defects in congenital muscular dystrophies and a cellular mechanism of cortical malformation distinct from that of the reeler mouse, double cortex syndrome, and periventricular heterotopia.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk