Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Psychiatry. 2007 Jan;164(1):160-2.

A comparison of aripiprazole, methylphenidate, and placebo for amphetamine dependence.

Author information

1
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio, and the Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. jari.tiihonen@niuva.fi

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Problems related to illegal amphetamine use have become a major public health issue in many developed countries. To date, evidence on the effectiveness of psychosocial treatments has remained modest, and no pharmacotherapy has proven effective for amphetamine dependence.

METHOD:

Individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for intravenous amphetamine dependence (N=53) were randomly assigned to receive aripiprazole (15 mg/day), slow-release methylphenidate (54 mg/day), or placebo for 20 weeks. The study was terminated prematurely due to unexpected results of interim analysis. An intention-to-treat analysis was used. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of amphetamine-positive urine samples.

RESULTS:

Patients allocated to aripiprazole had significantly more amphetamine-positive urine samples than patients in the placebo group (odds ratio=3.77, 95% CI=1.55-9.18), whereas patients who received methylphenidate had significantly fewer amphetamine-positive urine samples than patients who had received placebo (odds ratio=0.46, 95% CI=0.26-0.81).

CONCLUSIONS:

Methylphenidate is an effective treatment for reducing intravenous drug use in patients with severe amphetamine dependence.

PMID:
17202560
DOI:
10.1176/ajp.2007.164.1.160
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center